Fashion: Explanation Of Funky Offish & New 60’s Mod

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Maybe you already heard about the terms Funky Offish and New 60’s Mod? Two new terms added to the ungoing naming of fashiontrends, like the well-known minimalism style we see a lot on fashionbloggers. When you think about minimalism or minimalistic, everyone could think of a way of dressing suitable to that particular style. The name already says it, right? In terms of the Oxford Dictionary: Lacking decoration or adornment; deliberately simple or basic in design or style.

But how about Funky Offish? Or New 60’s Mod? It’s not that it already explains itself. Well, I have some explanation for you guys, because you are going to see these two styles a lot for the upcoming fashion season.

First of all: Funky Offish. Invented by Pixie Geldof, Ashley Williams and Julia Sarr-Jamois. It’s an abbreviation of Funky and Official (or Offish as they like to call it). Pixie and Ashley blew life into this new term after they discussed about what Pixie should be wearing to an appointment with her lawyer. She wanted to look official, but funky at the same time. So Funky Offish was born. Examples of this trend are: mixing up official clothing like a suit with some funky details like sportswear (sneakers!), logo-mania (Chanel, Moschino all over the place), streetwear, color of choice: pink, cartoons and other funky prints on tees.

Second: New 60’s Mod. You can recognize this trend on its A-line silhouet, short dresses, bold prints, colorful, etc. 60’s Mod also refers to the looks of the 1960’s, obviously. Mod is short for Modernist, which refers to the period after the Second World War where youths were able to spend their money on expressive and bold fashion (such as icons like Twiggy). Nowadays it’s about sleek lines, simple silhouettes, graphic prints, colorful accessories, knee-high boots (remember Miley Cyrus at the Amsterdam EMAs?).

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